Public Resources

Traffic incidents create unsafe situations for motorists and pedestrians, put responders' lives at risk and can cause travel delays. Traffic Incident Management (TIM) responders – including fire, police, ambulance, transportation crews and towing and recovery professionals – work together to help motorists clear incidents safely and quickly. Responders can't do it alone. As a driver, you must also do your part to help keep everyone safe and moving on our roadways.

What you can do:

If you are involved in a traffic incident, you must take certain actions to ensure safety and compliance with the law. 

  1. Move your car to a safe place – out of travel lanes – if you are involved in a minor collision and there are no injuries.

  2. When you see flashing lights ahead of you, move over or slow down. Give responders room to work in the roadway.

  3. Help keep your loved ones safe. Tell your friends and family about TIM practices.

TIM by the numbers:

4 minutes: How long traffic is delayed for every minute a lane is blocked.

2.8 billion gallons: The amount of fuel wasted annually nationwide due to being stuck in traffic.

38,000: The number of responders in harm's way at an incident scene in a 24-hour period.

20,000: The average number of first responders injured annually nationwide while responding to traffic incidents.

 

Quick Clearance PSA

If you are involved in a non-injury crash, and your vehicle can be moved, it's imperative that you drive it out of the travel lanes, then call for help. Quick clearance reduces the chance of secondary collisions, and that keeps you, and the people who help you, safe, after a crash.

Quick Clearance Poster

Download: Quick Clearance Poster

Poster - Quick Clearance

Quick Clearance can make the best out of a bad situation. If you’re involved in a freeway fender bender, the misconception that it’s best to stay put can leave you in danger, create hazardous slowing and lane changes for all drivers, and increase risks for emergency responders. Quick Clearance is TIM-speak for when drivers involved in minor crashes that don’t result in injuries get vehicles out of travel lanes as soon as it’s safe to do so. Moving your vehicle to the emergency shoulder, median or exiting the highway also provides a safer environment for first responders and keeps travel lanes clear for other vehicles, reducing the chance of a secondary collision.

Work Zone Safety PSA

Work-zone safety is important not only to protect those who build and maintain Arizona’s roadways, but also to protect motorists. About 80 percent of those killed in work-zone crashes are drivers and their passengers. Preventable rear-end collisions are the most common type of work-zone crash. Simple things, such as slowing down, obeying signs and flaggers, and preparing for lane restrictions go a long way to keep everyone safe.

MOVE OVER AZ

Arizona's Move Over law requires you to move over -- or slow down -- when you drive past ANY vehicle pulled over with flashing lights.

EVERY VEHICLE - EVERY TIME.